Featured List

Maxine Hong Kingston

Our newest Top Ten list comes from one of America’s most celebrated writers, Maxine Hong Kingston, who has used Chinese-American experiences to depict the human condition through several works of nonfiction and one novel.

The daughter of Chinese immigrants who operated a California gambling house in the 1940s and later a laundry, Kingston often blends autobiography and mythology in her work. Her first book – “The Woman Warrior” (1976) which won the National Book ... read more ...

The Book: The Top Ten

    Barry Unsworth, R.I.P.

     

    Barry Unsworth, a Top Ten contributor, has died of lung cancer. He was 81.

    The New York Times reports: “Unsworth, considered one of the foremost historical novelists in English, was known for rich, densely textured fiction that conjured lost worlds — those of the Trojan War, medieval Europe and the Napoleonic age, among many others.

    John Irving's Top Ten List

     

    John Irving’s 13th novel, “In One Person,” opens with a very funny scene about a young man whose efforts to check out a book are complicated by his lust for his local librarian.

     

    While most readers will focus on the character’s aching tumescence, we Top Tenner’s have but one question: What book is he trying to check out?

     

    We can also guess the answer, because it is one of Irving’s very books (pip, pip, hooray!).

     

    Diana Abu-Jaber's Top Ten List

     

    Diana Abu-Jaber is the newest member of the Top Ten Family. She is a versatile writer of memoir, fiction and essays whose work focuses on the nexus and tension between identity and culture – a natural topic for Diana, the daughter of an Irish Catholic mother and Jordanian Muslim father.

    Ann Patchett Demands a Pulitzer For Somebody

    Ann Patchett has offered an eloquent response to the Pulitzer committee that decided not to award a prize in fiction this year. She writes:

     

    "Reading fiction is important. It is a vital means of imagining a life other than our own, which in turn makes us more empathetic beings. Following complex story lines stretches our brains beyond the 140 characters of sound-bite thinking, and staying within the world of a novel gives us the ability to be quiet and alone, two skills that are disappearing faster than the polar icecaps.

     

    Pages

    New List

    Joyce Carol Oates

    1. Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky (1866).
    2. Ulysses by James Joyce (1922).
    3. The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner (1929).
    4. The poems of Emily Dickinson (1830–86).
    5. The stories of Franz Kafka (1883–1924).
    6. The Red and the Black by Stendhal (1830).
    7. The Rainbow by D. H. Lawrence (1915).
    8. Women in Love by D. H. Lawrence (1920).
    9. Moby-Dick by Herman Melville (1851).
    10. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain (1884).




     

    Classic List

    Mary Gaitskill

    1. Ulysses by James Joyce (1922).
    2. Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov (1955).
    3. Pale Fire by Vladimir Nabokov (1962).
    4. Bleak House by Charles Dickens (1853).
    5. Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert (1857).
    6. To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf (1927).
    7. Gusev by Anton Chekhov (1860–1904).
    8. Peter Pan by J. M. Barrie (1904).
    9. Dead Souls by Nikolai Gogol (1842).
    10. The Hunchback of Notre Dame by Victor Hugo (1831).

     





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