A Personal Matter

A Personal Matter  by Kenzaburo Oë (1969). The preeminent voice of Japan’s New Left from the 1960s, Oë brings a most un-Japanese rawness and rebellion to his semiautobiographical story of a young intellectual who fathers a brain-damaged baby. This modern morality tale juxtaposes its protagonist’s tortuous cerebral musings with a visceral world of blood and bile, sexual deviance, and medically sanctioned infanticide. Oë’s grotesqueries paradoxically render his characters more human and sympathetic, rather than less, while the sometimes self-conscious artifice of his language accommodates a society adrift from tradition and meaning.

Total Points: 1 (DMe 1)

Total Points: 
(1)

New List

Peter Blauner

1. Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy (1877).

2. The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton (1905).

3. Call It Sleep by Henry Roth (1934).

4. A Rage in Harlem by Chester Himes (1957).

5. What I Loved by Siri Hustvedt (2003).

6. The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love by Oscar Hijuelos (1989).

7. Falling Angel by William Hjortsberg.

8. Appointment in Samarra by John O’Hara (1934).

9. American Pastoral by Philip Roth (1997).

10. The Big Sleep by Raymond Chandler (1939). 

 

Classic List

Amy Bloom

 

1. The Deptford trilogy by Robertson Davies (1983).
2.Persuasion by Jane Austen (1817).
3. His Dark Materialsby Philip Pullman (1995–2000).
4.The Stone Diaries by Carol Shields (1995).
5.The Known World by Edward P. Jones (2003).
6. The Beggar Maid by Alice Munro (1978).
7. The Plot Against Americaby Philip Roth.
8. The Hours by Michael Cunningham (1998).
9. Fancies and Goodnights by John Collier (1951).
10. Larry’s Party by Carol Shields (1997).

 

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