Lev Grossman's Top Ten List

Reader Bio

Lev Grossman(born 1969) is an American novelist of fantasy fiction. His first novel, Warp (1997) is the story of aimless twenty-something in Boston who has trouble distinguishing between reality and Star Trek. His breakthrough novel, the international bestseller Codex (2004), is a thriller about a rare medieval manuscript. His next novel, The Magicians (2009) is a dark fantasy about a Brooklyn boy who discovers the magic he’s read about in books is real. He has continued the trilogy with The Magician King (2011) and The Magician’s Land (2014). He is also Time magazine’s chief book critic.

1. Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert (1857). Of the many nineteenth-century novels about adulteresses, only Madame Bovary features a heroine frankly detested by her author. Flaubert battled for five years to complete his meticulous portrait of extramarital romance in the French provinces, and he complained endlessly in letters about his love-starved main character— so inferior, he felt, to himself. In the end, however, he came to peace with her, famously saying, “Madame Bovary: c’est moi.” A model of gorgeous style and perfect characterization, the novel is a testament to how yearning for a higher life both elevates and destroys us.

2. Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf (1925). This masterpiece of concision and interior monologue recounts events in the life of Clarissa Dalloway, a delicate, upper-class London wife and mother, as she prepares for a party at her home on a single day in June 1923. In a parallel subsidiary plot, a shell-shocked World War I veteran Clarissa encounters spirals into suicide rather than submit to soul-stealing experimental psycho­ therapy. The novel explores questions of time, memory, love, class, and life choices through Woolf’s intricate melding of points of view and powerful use of flashback.

3. Arcadia by Tom Stoppard (1993). This play takes us back and forth between the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, ranging over the nature of truth and time, the difference between the Classical and the Romantic temperament, and the disruptive influence of sex on our orbits in life. Focusing on the mysteries—romantic, scientific, literary—that engage the minds and hearts of characters whose passions and lives intersect across scientific planes and centuries.

4. Ulysses by James Joyce (1922). Filled with convoluted plotting, scrambled syntax, puns, neologisms, and arcane mythological allusions, Ulysses recounts the misadventures of schlubby Dublin advertising salesman Leopold Bloom on a single day, June 16, 1904. As Everyman Bloom and a host of other characters act out, on a banal and quotidian scale, the major episodes of Homer’s ­Odyssey—including encounters with modern-day sirens and a Cyclops—Joyce’s bawdy mock-epic suggests the improbability, perhaps even the pointlessness, of heroism in the modern age.

5. The Trial by Franz Kafka (1925). The Trial is not just a book, but a cultural icon; Kafka is not just a writer but a mindset—“Kafkaesque.” Here, Everyman Josef K is persecuted by a mysterious and sadistic Law, which has condemned him in advance for a crime of which he knows nothing. Modern anxieties are given near-archetypal form in this parable that seems both to foretell the totalitarian societies to come and to mourn our alienation from a terrible Old Testament God.  

6. The Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis (1950-56).

 

 

 

 

7. The Once and Future King by T.H. White (1958). This retelling of the saga of King Arthur is a fantasy classic as legendary as Excalibur and Camelot, and a poignant story of adventure, romance, and magic. Robert Goolrick calls it “the perfect boys’ book.”

 

8. Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh (1945). Waugh was one of the twentieth century’s great satirists, yet this novel, widely considered his best, is not satiric. It is, instead, an examination of Roman Catholic faith as it is used, abused, embraced, and rejected by the Flytes, an aristocratic English family visited by alcoholism, adultery, and homoeroticism.

 

9. Troilus and Criseyde by Geoffrey Chaucer (1381). The first great love story in English, this epic poem tells the story of what befell two lovers, Criseyde and Troilus, during the Trojan war. Criseyde is a stunner: “So aungellyk was hir natyf beautee / That lyk a thing immortal semed she.” Troilus is a Trojan prince. Alas, Criseyde can’t dally in Troy—she is forced to leave to go to the Greeks, for whom her father, a soothsayer, is working. Her pledge of eternal fidelity to Troilus is broken when she is seduced by the Greek warrior Diomedes. Is she a tramp or a victim of circumstances? Chaucer overturns the tiresome clichés of medieval misogyny in his humanistic treatment of this story.

10. Dead Souls by Nikolai Gogol (1842). Gogol’s self-proclaimed narrative “poem” follows the comical ambitions of Chichikov, who travels around the country buying the “dead souls” of serfs not yet stricken from the tax rolls. A stinging satire of Russian bureaucracy, social rank, and serfdom, Dead Souls also soars as Gogol’s portrait of “all Russia,” racing on “like a brisk, unbeatable troika” before which “other nations and states step aside to make way.”

New List

Bobbie Ann Mason

1. Hamlet by William Shakespeare (1600).
2. Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov (1955).
3. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald (1925).
4. A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce (1916).
5. The Rime of the Ancient Mariner by Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1798).
6. The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway (1926).
7. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain (1884).
8. Parade’s End by Ford Madox Ford (1928).
9. Moby-Dick by Herman Melville (1851).
10. Emma by Jane Austen (1816).

Classic List

Mailey Meloy

1. Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy (1877).
2. One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel García Márquez (1967).
3. American Pastoral by Philip Roth (1997).
4. Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov (1955).
5. Nine Stories by J. D. Salinger (1953).
6. The Complete Aubrey/Maturin Novels by Patrick O'Brian (1914-2000).
7. The stories of Flannery O’Connor (1925–64).
8. Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh (1945).
9. Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell by Susanna Clarke (2004).
10. Blood Meridian: Or the Evening Redness in the West by Cormac McCarthy (1985).

 

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